Goa Arts and Literature Festival a hit with book lovers

By on December 23, 2017
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Goa Arts and Literature Festival a hit with book lovers

The eighth edition of the Goa Arts and Literature Festival (GALF) held at the International Centre Goa (ICG) from December 8-10 was a big hit with book lovers.


Organised by the ICG in conjunction with Goa Writers, the event began with rousing key note addresses by historian Ramchandra Guha and editor Mini Krishnan.
Guha said that history had taught us that there are no permanent winners or losers. “Historians cannot have political or religious leanings,” he added, citing the example of how a Marxist historian was not a real historian because of his/her political ideology.
Krishnan, editor of Translations at the Oxford University Press, explained how greater integration was possible through translations in a diverse country like India.
The evening saw the unveiling of an artwork by Panaji-based artist Hanuman Kambli, which was specially created for GALF 2017 and the release of a book of poems by Chorao-based Salil Chaturvedi.
During the course of the festival, Sahitya Akademi Award winner Ganesh Devy pointed out how the People’s Language Survey of India initiated by Vadodara-based Bhasha Research Centre comprised interviews with the common man and had captured the pulse of the people.
Adding a culinary touch to the festival, Delhi-based author Sadia Dehlvi regaled audiences with wonderful anecdotes about her family and the culinary history of Delhi as she discussed her book ‘Jasmine and the Djinns’, which encapsulated some ‘mouth-watering’ Mughlai recipes and stories from the capital.
Languages other than English also dominated the festival, as ‘Goem-Ek Dhuvechi Kani’, the Konkani translation of noted scholar Maria Aurora Couto’s popular book ‘Goa – A daughter’s story’ was launched on the penultimate day of the three-day event.
Couto said, “My book is about the culture and people of Goa and I was very keen that a Konkani translation was brought out to reach the people of Goa.”
In a later session, scholars M Asaduddin and Rakhshanda Jalil, and author Annie Zaidi discussed the topic of ‘Indomitable Urdu’ with much enthusiasm. Jalil said that people wanting to learn Urdu must make efforts to learn the script. “I sometimes wonder why there is so much fear to learn the Urdu script when people can learn the Chinese and Japanese scripts,” Jalil said.
The curtains came down on the festival with a special tribute programme in the memory of the late, Mumbai-based poet Eunice de Souza.
Mumbai-based writer Jerry Pinto termed her as the ‘mistress of condensation’ and praised her ability to be economical with words. “For instance, in one of her 48-word poems, Eunice ended by saying that it was too long,” he recalled.
On the last Sunday, Archbishop of Goa Rev Felipe Neri Ferrao released Teresa Albuquerque’s book ‘The Portuguese Impress’.
The children’s sessions organised everyday by the Bookworm Library were also very popular and culminated in a well-attended school quiz on Sunday.

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